EAW004210 ENGLAND (1947). Queen Mary in dry dock, Southampton, 1947

© Hawlfraint cyfranwyr OpenStreetMap a thrwyddedwyd gan yr OpenStreetMap Foundation. 2021. Trwyddedir y gartograffeg fel CC BY-SA.

Delweddau cyfagos (19)

EAW004210
  0° 0m
EAW001352
  83° 35m
EAW001351
  3° 37m
EAW004211
  45° 44m
EPW043735
  151° 132m
EPW043733
  151° 140m
EPW043727
  150° 161m
EAW051307
  64° 195m
EPW043734
  152° 200m
EPW043736
  151° 205m
EAW051310
  51° 206m
EAW229813
  240° 208m
EPW043729
  156° 212m
EAW051308
  59° 227m
EAW035807
  61° 228m
EAW051309
  39° 228m
EPW042951
  157° 252m
EPW043726
  154° 269m
EAW035806
  48° 299m

Manylion

Pennawd [EAW004210] Queen Mary in dry dock, Southampton, 1947
Cyfeirnod EAW004210
Dyddiad 10-April-1947
Dolen
Enw lle SOUTHAMPTON
Plwyf
Ardal
Gwlad ENGLAND
Dwyreiniad / Gogleddiad 439329, 112368
Hydred / Lledred -1.4405545217033, 50.90888775768
Cyfeirnod Grid Cenedlaethol SU393124

Pinnau

Redundant or surplus naval mines? For a photograph see the Imperial War Museum (IWM) example of a mark XVII, which were 48 inches tall (1.22m) and 40 inches diameter (1.02m). Those in the BfA image seem larger, when compared to the double decker buses behind, but if the IWM example is a mark 17, presumably there were 16 types before hand, some of which may have been bigger. As a child, (late1950s, early '60s) I remember seeing old mines at seaside towns, painted red and used as coin collecting boxes for donations for, I think, ship-wrecked sailors. I seem to recall one on the Gordon Promenade at Gravesend and asking my parents what it was. The Royal Navy laid extensive mine fields around the British coast during WW2 to counter the risk of invasion and as a weapon against German U-boats. These must have been cleared after the War, made safe, and held at various locations pending final disposal. See: https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/30021858

Kentishman
Friday 5th of March 2021 07:21:00 AM
See also https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Naval_mines_of_the_United_Kingdom

Kentishman
Friday 5th of March 2021 07:39:39 AM
Very large ships' propellers

ken
Sunday 19th of July 2015 01:09:00 PM
Ships' lifeboats

ken
Sunday 19th of July 2015 01:08:17 PM
I always looked out of the passing train to see what was in the dry dock.... and indeed one day there was the Queen Mary, but not on this occasion as my viewing started about ten years later!

Maurice
Wednesday 28th of August 2013 08:28:45 AM
The Queen Mary undergoing conversion back to being a Cunard liner. The grey paint is giving way to black on the hull and the funnels have already got black tops and seem to have been repainted red, but it is hard to tell as red is a difficult colour to 'see' (detect might be a better word) in black and white pictures!

Maurice
Wednesday 28th of August 2013 08:26:51 AM
Now here's the real question about this image; what are the large, black spheres so neatly piled up at Southampton Docks?

Katy Whitaker
Tuesday 27th of August 2013 11:18:53 PM
I suspect they are floats, like large glass fishing net floats. These would have carried anti-submarine nets in or around the Solent area. Just a guess!

Maurice
Wednesday 28th of August 2013 08:22:15 AM