EAW047074 ENGLAND (1952). The aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone rail crash, Wealdstone, 1952. This image was marked by Aerofilms Ltd for photo editing.

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Nearby Images (25)

EAW047074
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EAW047065
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EAW047067
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EAW047068
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EAW047073
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EPW035058
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Details

Title [EAW047074] The aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone rail crash, Wealdstone, 1952. This image was marked by Aerofilms Ltd for photo editing.
Reference EAW047074
Date 8-October-1952
Link
Place name WEALDSTONE
Parish
District
Country ENGLAND
Easting / Northing 515414, 189538
Longitude / Latitude -0.33369538348465, 51.592381243554
National Grid Reference TQ154895

Pins

Harrow signal box No. 1

Billy Turner
Saturday 9th of January 2016 05:09:41 PM
1949 Humber Limousine

Billy Turner
Saturday 9th of January 2016 04:57:01 PM
Steam Breakdown Crane

Billy Turner
Saturday 9th of January 2016 04:40:56 PM
Dennis F8 Fire Engine

Billy Turner
Saturday 9th of January 2016 03:10:31 PM
46202 Princess Ann, scrapped after the collision.

Billy Turner
Saturday 9th of January 2016 02:55:39 PM

gBr
Saturday 6th of May 2017 08:44:12 PM

User Comment Contributions

The Harrow and Wealdstone rail crash was a three-train collision at Harrow and Wealdstone station in London during the morning rush hour of 8 October 1952. 112 people were killed and 340 injured (88 of these being detained in hospital); it remains the worst peacetime rail crash in the United Kingdom.[1]

An overnight express train from Perth crashed at speed into the rear of a local passenger train standing at a platform at the station. The wreckage blocked adjacent lines and was struck within seconds by a "double-headed" express train travelling north at 60 mph (97 km/h). A subsequent Ministry of Transport report on the crash found that the driver of the Perth train had passed a caution signal and two danger signals before colliding with the local train. The accident accelerated the introduction of Automatic Warning System – by the time the report had been published British Railways had agreed to a five-year plan to install the system that warned drivers that they had passed an adverse signal.

Billy Turner
Friday 8th of January 2016 09:49:58 PM