EAW047066 ENGLAND (1952). The aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone rail crash, Wealdstone, 1952. This image was marked by Aerofilms Ltd for photo editing.

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Nearby Images (24)

EAW047066
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EAW047065
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EAW047074
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EAW047067
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EAW047083
  193° 33m
EAW047069
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EAW047068
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EAW047070
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EAW047073
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EAW047077
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EAW047078
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EAW047075
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EAW047079
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EAW047076
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EAW047080
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EAW047071
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EAW047082
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EAW047072
  135° 72m
EAW047081
  93° 72m
EPW005359
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EAW047085
  153° 79m
EAW047084
  133° 89m
EPW053686
  131° 121m
EPW062566
  261° 245m

Details

Title [EAW047066] The aftermath of the Harrow and Wealdstone rail crash, Wealdstone, 1952. This image was marked by Aerofilms Ltd for photo editing.
Reference EAW047066
Date 8-October-1952
Link
Place name WEALDSTONE
Parish
District
Country ENGLAND
Easting / Northing 515392, 189524
Longitude / Latitude -0.33401747141912, 51.592259911112
National Grid Reference TQ154895

Pins

Train loco, ex Turboloco and only rebuilt six weeks earlier to a conventional form, 46202 "Princes Anne". Very badly damaged but not scraped until several weeks later. It's place in the roster was eventually taken by 71000 "Duke of Gloucester". This link explains. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LMS_Turbomotive

John Wass
Wednesday 4th of March 2015 08:06:34 PM
Pilot loco Jubilee class 45637 "Windward Islands", damaged beyond repair.

John Wass
Wednesday 4th of March 2015 07:58:58 PM

User Comment Contributions

The Harrow and Wealdstone rail crash was a three-train collision at Harrow and Wealdstone station in London during the morning rush hour of 8 October 1952. 112 people were killed and 340 injured (88 of these being detained in hospital); it remains the worst peacetime rail crash in the United Kingdom.[1]

An overnight express train from Perth crashed at speed into the rear of a local passenger train standing at a platform at the station. The wreckage blocked adjacent lines and was struck within seconds by a "double-headed" express train travelling north at 60 mph (97 km/h). A subsequent Ministry of Transport report on the crash found that the driver of the Perth train had passed a caution signal and two danger signals before colliding with the local train. The accident accelerated the introduction of Automatic Warning System – by the time the report had been published British Railways had agreed to a five-year plan to install the system that warned drivers that they had passed an adverse signal.

Billy Turner
Friday 8th of January 2016 09:52:11 PM