EAW002361 ENGLAND (1946). Preston Hall Sanatorium at the British Legion Village, Aylesford, 1946

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Nearby Images (7)

EAW002361
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EAW002364
  125° 43m
EAW002359
  284° 57m
EAW002363
  332° 72m
EAW002360
  216° 136m
EAW002362
  357° 217m
EAW002358
  308° 274m

Details

Title [EAW002361] Preston Hall Sanatorium at the British Legion Village, Aylesford, 1946
Reference EAW002361
Date 9-September-1946
Link
Place name AYLESFORD
Parish AYLESFORD
District
Country ENGLAND
Easting / Northing 572807, 157970
Longitude / Latitude 0.47881105712711, 51.294091155864
National Grid Reference TQ728580

Pins

George Orwell (Eric Arthur Blair), the writer and broadcaster, was a patient at Preston Hall from March to September 1938.

Kentishman
Thursday 18th of March 2021 04:48:51 PM
These bungalows were purpose built for the long term accommodation of tubercular ex-servicemen and their families after WW1. Initially known as The Colony, it became British Legion Village when taken over by the British Legion in 1925. Its name was changed to Royal British Legion Village in 1971, the fiftieth anniversary of the British Legion's creation. See: http://www.rblv.co.uk/index.html

Kentishman
Saturday 27th of February 2016 03:10:04 PM
Used by the Red Cross during WW1 as a hospital for the treatment of service men with respiratory problems, especially tuberculosis and the effects of poison gas.

Kentishman
Saturday 27th of February 2016 02:58:26 PM
British Legion Village Post Office and shop, money for the building was donated by the Empress Club Emergency Aid Committee in 1923. See: http://www.rblv.co.uk/index.html

Kentishman
Saturday 27th of February 2016 02:56:28 PM
Hermitage Lane leading South and up to Barming.

Kentishman
Wednesday 17th of February 2016 06:11:41 PM

User Comment Contributions

Two aspects of importance in this image. First Preston Hall was used as a chest hospital during WW1, treating soldiers who had been gassed or contracted tuberculosis. Secondly, in the distance, along Hermitage Lane, are the small bungalows erected for disabled service men from WW1, known initially as The Colony, and later as British Legion Village.

Kentishman
Saturday 27th of February 2016 02:31:35 PM