SPW048776 SCOTLAND (1935). Glasgow, general view, showing Queen's Dock and General Terminus Quay. An oblique aerial photograph taken facing south-east. This image has been produced from a print.

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Nearby Images (9)

SPW048776
  0° 0m
SAW009728
  96° 181m
SAW028371
  56° 216m
SAW009736
  92° 240m
SAW028367
  49° 248m
SAW028368
  49° 248m
SAW028369
  49° 248m
SAW028370
  49° 248m
SAW028372
  49° 248m

Details

Title [SPW048776] Glasgow, general view, showing Queen's Dock and General Terminus Quay. An oblique aerial photograph taken facing south-east. This image has been produced from a print.
Reference SPW048776
Date 1935
Link Canmore Collection item 1315584
Place name
Parish GLASGOW (CITY OF GLASGOW)
District CITY OF GLASGOW
Country SCOTLAND
Easting / Northing 257450, 665100
Longitude / Latitude -4.2777341316911, 55.858010176335
National Grid Reference NS575651

Pins

Glasgow Harbour Tunnel Rotundas. This is the North Rotunda located on Tunnel Street with the South Rotunda at Plantation Place. The Glasgow Harbour Tunnel Rotundas are two iconic red brick stone buildings which flank the River Clyde in the Finnieston area. Designed by Simpson and Wilson, and built between 1890 and 1896 by Glasgow Tunnel Company, the Rotunda covered 24-metre (79 ft) deep shafts to tunnels which enabled vehicular and pedestrian access to the other side of the river. Pedestrians, horses and carts - and later motor vehicles - would be hauled up by hydraulic lifts provided by Otis Elevator Company of New York. During the Second World War, the tunnels were temporarily closed because all the metal from the lifts was removed to contribute to the war effort. The tunnels were an expensive venture to run and were passed to the council to run as a service in 1926. The increased costs of running the tunnels which were prone to damp and the increase of motor cars on the roads lead to the closure of the pedestrian tunnel in 1980, and the vehicular tunnels being filled in 1986. Though the pedestrian tunnel still exists, it is closed to the public. Originally, three-storey red and white brick towers stood alongside the Rotundas, containing the hydraulic accumulators that powered the lifts, but these have been demolished. See South Rotunda below.

Billy Turner
Tuesday 29th of November 2016 06:23:48 PM
South Rotunda at Plantation Place

Billy Turner
Tuesday 29th of November 2016 06:18:42 PM