SPW045821 SCOTLAND (1934). John Brown's Shipyard, Clydebank, Queen Mary under construction. An oblique aerial photograph taken facing west.

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Details

Title [SPW045821] John Brown's Shipyard, Clydebank, Queen Mary under construction. An oblique aerial photograph taken facing west.
Reference SPW045821
Date 1934
Link Canmore Collection item 1257671
Place name
Parish OLD KILPATRICK (CLYDEBANK)
District CLYDEBANK
Country SCOTLAND
Easting / Northing 249485, 669758
Longitude / Latitude -4.4074679137064, 55.897409755484
National Grid Reference NS495698

Pins

Titan crane. Is a 150-foot-high (46 m) cantilever crane. In 1905, a £24,600 order for the crane was placed with Dalmarnock based engineering company Sir William Arrol & Co. Titan was completed two years later in 1907. It was designed to be used in the lifting of heavy equipment, such as engines and boilers, during the fitting-out of battleships and ocean liners at the John Brown & Company shipyard. It was also the world's first electrically powered cantilever crane, and the largest crane of its type at the time of its completion. Situated at the end of a U-shaped fitting out basin, the crane was used to construct some of the largest ships of the 20th century, including the Queen Mary, Queen Elizabeth and Queen Elizabeth 2. The Category A Listed historical structure was refurbished in 2007 as a tourist attraction and shipbuilding museum. The crane fell into disuse in 1980s, and in the intervening period of neglect, the crane suffered vandalism to the wheelhouse and corrosion to the structure. In 1988 the crane was recognised as a Category A Listed historical structure. The urban regeneration company Clydebank Re-Built started a £3.75m restoration project in 2005, and the crane opened to the public in August 2007. The structure was shot-blasted to remove old paint and rust, allowing repairs to be undertaken before repainting. A lift for visitors to ascend to the jib and an emergency evacuation stair were installed, along with a wire mesh around the viewing area and floodlights to illuminate the crane at night.

Billy Turner
Tuesday 29th of November 2016 04:38:37 PM
packing and loading plant

Dylan Moore
Wednesday 12th of August 2015 10:32:59 PM

Dylan Moore
Wednesday 12th of August 2015 10:32:30 PM

Dylan Moore
Wednesday 12th of August 2015 10:32:05 PM

User Comment Contributions

Clyde Cement Works: a clinker grinding plant operated by Tunnel 1933-1967. The clinker mainly came by sea from West Thurrock.

Dylan Moore
Wednesday 12th of August 2015 10:33:19 PM