EPW058500 ENGLAND (1938). Marine Parade, Southend-on-Sea, 1938

© Copyright OpenStreetMap contributors and licensed by the OpenStreetMap Foundation. 2020. Cartography is licensed as CC BY-SA.

Nearby Images (32)

EPW058500
  0° 0m
EPW000552
  164° 33m
EPW016549
  243° 33m
EPW054671
  300° 40m
EPW036723
  227° 62m
EPW037016
  133° 92m
EPW037007
  225° 94m
EAW002206
  191° 97m
EPW058222
  112° 154m
EPW040978
  233° 157m
EAW053074
  279° 162m
EPW024890
  66° 164m
EPW040975
  247° 165m
EPW058224
  96° 183m
EAW002219
  125° 186m
EPW036705
  260° 189m
EPW010871
  42° 192m
EPW000443
  86° 200m
EPW037024
  237° 200m
EPW036730
  98° 201m
EPW054672
  277° 211m
EAW002218
  265° 223m
EAW002204
  223° 230m
EPW058226
  108° 230m
EPW062741
  256° 233m
EPW036995
  116° 237m
EAW053086
  116° 241m
EAW002205
  229° 254m
EPW000553
  240° 263m
EPW000550
  232° 284m
EAW026899
  235° 297m
EPW000549
  227° 302m

Details

Title [EPW058500] Marine Parade, Southend-on-Sea, 1938
Reference EPW058500
Date 3-August-1938
Link
Place name SOUTHEND-ON-SEA
Parish
District
Country ENGLAND
Easting / Northing 588822, 185067
Longitude / Latitude 0.72270201974814, 51.53240549336
National Grid Reference TQ888851

Pins

100Tons 107ft loa TSMV New Prince of Wales, Sotuehnd motor navigation Co, owned and operated by Skipper A.E. Brand & Chief Engineer W.H. Wilson requisitioned for Dunkirk service and lost due to the untrained RN "scratch crew" assigned aboard, who had ignorantly topped-off the petrol/parafin fuel tanks with Diesel. This caused frequent engine-stoppages en route for Dunkirk and a final one off the La Panne beaches which gave the Germans a "static target. The young RN Sub.Lieut. Skipper P.H.E. Bennett and two of his equally young crew were saved by the MV Triton. The New Prince of Wales sank in very shallow water - just covering her main deck when she'd settled.two of her crew were killed.

bargee1937
Sunday 3rd of April 2016 12:37:28 AM
This may be J. Polkinghorn's yawl "Dreadnought", which survived being laid-up in a mud berth through the war, and was converted to a twin-screw motor boat in 1946. certainly this was the beach pitch that Mr. polkinghorn was leasing from 1946 ro the 1960's.

bargee1937
Sunday 3rd of April 2016 12:35:06 AM
One of the only two remaining "sailing lifeboats" of Southend, still operating in 1938 - many excursion-boat owners having bought motor launches. The other Sailing Lifeboat was operating from the Chalkwell beach - see aerial photo of that area. These lovely "lugger-rigged" sailing vessels were 60ft long, and double-ended. and the type had been a much-loved feature of the Foreshore from the late 1890's, but growing fewer each year as more motor vessels were introduced. Unfortunately this commentator doesn't know - with any certainty,- the names of any of the 3 large sailing vessels still operating from the foreshore just prior to the Outbreak of War on 3rd september, 1939.

bargee1937
Thursday 18th of June 2015 03:19:26 PM
The pretty and sightly 65ft "TSMV "Princess Maud" of the Southend Motor Navigation Co., Owner-Operators Skipper A.E. Brand and Chief Engineer W.H. Wilson. This Motor vessel was requisitioned on 27th May, 1940 for service off the shallow-water Dunkirk beaches during Operation Dynamo - running a ferry service between the beaches and larger ships anchored-off in deeper water, - a duty for which the vessel was uniquely suited since the French conditions were so similar to her normal summer operations at Southend. Lost through stranding on a falling tide at Bray-Dunes, which caused her to be abandoned by her inexperienced RN crew.

bargee1937
Thursday 18th of June 2015 03:12:51 PM
The two single-screw Motor Launches "San Toy I" and "San Toy II" of the Southend Motor Navigation Co., Owner-Operators Skipper A.E. Brand and Chief Engineer W.H. Wilson. These two launches licensed for 65 passengers each, were requisitioned on 27th May, 1940 for service off the shallow-water Dunkirk beaches during Operation Dynamo - running a ferry service between the beaches and larger ships anchored-off in deeper water, - a duty for which they were uniquely suited since the French conditions were so similar to their normal summer operations at Southend.

bargee1937
Thursday 18th of June 2015 03:08:13 PM