EPW023895 ENGLAND (1928). The Cobb, Lyme Regis, 1928

© Hawlfraint cyfranwyr OpenStreetMap a thrwyddedwyd gan yr OpenStreetMap Foundation. 2022. Trwyddedir y gartograffeg fel CC BY-SA.

Delweddau cyfagos (8)

EPW023895
  0° 0m
EPW024178
  37° 31m
EPW013476
  5° 64m
EAW050065
  322° 99m
EPW039714
  28° 128m
EAW033661
  199° 153m
EPW023894
  343° 190m
EPW039716
  22° 264m

Manylion

Pennawd [EPW023895] The Cobb, Lyme Regis, 1928
Cyfeirnod EPW023895
Dyddiad September-1928
Dolen
Enw lle LYME REGIS
Plwyf LYME REGIS
Ardal
Gwlad ENGLAND
Dwyreiniad / Gogleddiad 333900, 91511
Hydred / Lledred -2.9364546642694, 50.718888713799
Cyfeirnod Grid Cenedlaethol SY339915

Pinnau

this building is the only one remaining today

Dylan Moore
Thursday 5th of November 2015 10:31:22 AM

Dylan Moore
Thursday 5th of November 2015 10:29:15 AM
power house stack

Dylan Moore
Thursday 5th of November 2015 10:28:18 AM
Inter-bedded limestone and shale: Blue Lias Formation

Dylan Moore
Tuesday 21st of October 2014 10:16:43 AM
Clay: Charmouth Mudstone Formation

Dylan Moore
Tuesday 21st of October 2014 10:15:24 AM
Jurassic Cliffs

Alan McFaden
Friday 11th of April 2014 09:27:01 AM

Alan McFaden
Friday 11th of April 2014 09:13:00 AM

Alan McFaden
Friday 11th of April 2014 09:10:18 AM

Class31
Sunday 28th of October 2012 10:59:16 PM
Ozone Terrace

Class31
Sunday 28th of October 2012 10:58:54 PM
cement plant

Dylan Moore
Wednesday 17th of October 2012 12:54:16 PM

Dylan Moore
Wednesday 17th of October 2012 12:53:48 PM
This was in fact the one remaining pylon of the ropeway that once brought limestone from the southwestern part of the foreshore. I recently found pictures of this in operation, and these will be found on my website.

Dylan Moore
Monday 30th of March 2015 03:53:31 PM

Cyfraniadau Grŵp

The Cobb 09/02/2014

Class31
Monday 10th of February 2014 04:08:29 PM
From the Cobb looking west.

Class31
Sunday 23rd of June 2013 08:38:55 PM
For details and many links, see [[http://www.cementkilns.co.uk/cement_kiln_lyme_regis.html]].

Dylan Moore
Thursday 18th of October 2012 08:43:59 PM
The Lyme Regis cement plant began in the 1820s making an imitation “Roman Cement” from concretions in the Lias Shale. The plant began making Portland cement around 1885, and was converted to chamber kiln operation around 1899. Like many such small marine-based plants, it faded away during WWI.

This image appears to show a structure in the water (it's high tide) which may have been associated with getting Lias limestone from the beach. Various footings are still there today.

Dylan Moore
Wednesday 17th of October 2012 01:01:08 PM